Food Journals and Tiny Habits

Summary: Doing something as simple as keeping a food journal may not only help your diet succeed, but it change your life. (Tweet this!)
food journal

Amazing things can start with a food journal

On walks with my dog I'm currently listening to the audiobook, The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business. After all that snow, it's great to get some fresh Spring air, a little exercise, while learning some truly amazing stuff.

I hope to review the book, err tape, err audio file... at some point in the near future. Today, I'd like to write about one very brief study mentioned in the book. I'm not even going to look up the study source, because it makes common sense if you think about it.

The book mentioned that the study asked some people who diet to simply keep track of what they ate once a week in a food journal. They weren't asked to change their eating or exercise habits in any way. Just keeping a journal changed how they ate:

“It was hard at first [writing down everything one day per week]. The subjects forgot to carry their food journals, or would snack and not note it…Eventually, it became a habit. Then something unexpected happened. The participant started looking at their entries and finding patterns they didn’t know existed. Some noticed they always seemed to snack at about 10 a.m., so they began keeping an apple or banana on their desks for mid-morning munchies. Others started using their journals to plan future menus, and when dinner rolled around, they ate the healthy meal they had written down, rather than junk food from the fridge.”

What they found is that the people who kept a food journal lost weight. Those who recorded their food more lost more weight.

I've noticed a similar thing in personal finance. Those who track their net-worth tend to have higher net-worths.

The act of tracking forces you to be mindful about the activity. If you are on a diet, you aren't going to want to write down that you ate triple burger with super fries and a thick shake. You not only have that mindfulness, but as the book mentions, you can go back and optimize your weaknesses. In addition you have a level of accountability.

What's even more exciting is that they found that the healthy habit spread into other areas of their lives. Those who ate healthier tended to exercise more. They smoke less. They were in better control of their spending.

A professor explained it as good habits "spill over." I like to say that they snowball.

This snowball effect is a central idea behind this website. If you are having trouble with one aspect of your life, perhaps improving another area will spill over and make the difference. If you start exercising, you'll feel better and have more energy. That will make you more productive. Being more productive makes you more money. Exercising improves your health, which may save you costly medical bills in the future.

One small habit can snowball into many positive changes in your life. Imagine what can happen if you just start with a simple food journal today.

This post involves:

Diet, Health / Fitness, Weight Loss

... and focuses on: